Deadly tube flies for early season fishing.

I prefer to have a range of large, colourful tube flies in my fly box for the start of the season. You never know what the conditions will be like, and if the river should become really cold and big, it is good to have a few flies you can really trust. The early-season fly fishing for the large and silvery June salmon has fascinated me for many years, which has led to the ”birth” of many a new fly. Many theories have been spawned over the years, and it is just this that ensures we become experienced and, as time goes by, will succeed more often in catching salmon.

The choice of fly can be difficult to make, regardless of conditions, and this is especially true when the river is huge. The challenge is that the salmon must be able to see the fly in the raging torrents rushing down the valley towards the sea. It will of course also be very important to select the right sinking line; after all it is the line that brings the fly into the path of the salmon. When you have selected the right line, so that you are certain that the fly will be presented to the salmon in a proper fashion, it is the choice of fly that will be the deciding factor for whether you will catch a salmon or not.

The challenge for many people can be the fly tying materials, I believe that these tube flies should be large, i.e. have long wings, and not all of us will have access to such materials. In reality, it is only temple dog or goat hair which comes in lengths of 12-20 centimetres. Thus, this will be an issue for most of us, we can find long silver fox hair in various colours, but these rarely come in lengths exceeding 10 cm. Therefore, many fly fishermen find this difficult!

 

Why should the tube flies be so large?
Conditions will always change, the amount of snow accumulating during the winter in combination with the arrival of spring are the factors affecting river levels. And when the river is really high and cold, it demands something special of the fly box. The salmon we fish for during the start of the season are heading very far upriver, the salmon behaviour now is that it will swim calmly upriver and only stop in places that are natural resting spots in connection with areas of the river that obstruct the salmon running further upstream. Many salmon are caught while they swim upstream when the river is high in June because it swims slowly upstream, and in many places it swims close to the river bank. However, normally it is easier to tempt when it has stopped to rest, it is also easier to fish the fly correctly over the salmon when it has stopped, and finally it is also easier to irritate it in this situation.

You will often fish to salmon that are moving during a spring flood, and therefore it is important to use a large tube fly, as the salmon will see such a fly more easily. Imagine the following scenario: the salmon is swimming up the river, your fly is “swimming” down the river; how long do you think the salmon can see the fly for each cast? Thus, the secret is to make this meeting between salmon and fly last longer, then the chances for a hook-up increases significantly. And this is best done with a correctly chosen sinking line, and a really big tube fly!

 

The fly pattern.
There is no right answer here; the types of colour combinations required will differ from river to river. Water temperature and the colour of the river will also affect the choice of fly. I recommend flies with strong colours for spring flood fishing, so I often tie flies using synthetic tying materials because these materials have strong colours with lots of flash in them, and they also maintain their colours when wet. In reality I use the same fly patterns as my favourite flies, but I use different materials in order to vary the flies according to the conditions. One example could be the famous Green Highlander, this is a fly I use from the start of the season and all the way through to the end of the season. I change the colour strength of the fly as the river conditions change. This means that the Green Highlander version I use during the first few days of the season is tied using shiny synthetic materials, whereas the one I use when the river is lower during the later part of the summer is tied without synthetic materials and with more “down to earth” colours in the body and wing.

The fly box for June fishing is the fly box containing the least amount of different fly patterns, throughout summer the number of patterns increase as the river conditions change. My favourite flies for the early-season fishing include: Green Highlander, Yellow White Wing, Teal and Silver, Blålystuba, The Fire, and Flomflua when the river is discoloured. I don’t feel that I need any other patterns than these.

 

Flashn Slinky.
Flash n Slinky is a synthetic fly tying material well suited for making wings, this material is great for lots of reasons. The “hair” length is 22 cm., thus I can easily tie flies with wing lengths that are more than long enough. The structure of the material means that it is not too stiff, but anyway it is only positive to use a material that is a bit stiffer when fishing a high river with strong currents, as the wing will not collapse as easily. What I really like about this material is the range of colours it comes in, and the colours are perfect for early-season fly fishing. The colours are “clean”, i.e. there are no other colour combinations mixed in which could dampen the colour strength, and there is also flash mixed in with a colouration that fits 100% with the main material. In other words; Flash n Slinky is ready to be tied straight onto the fly.

When I tie my flies using this material I actually tie in the wing in the same fashion as I do when tying “normal” tube flies. This means that Flash n Slinky also can be folded over, thus I tie the flies in the exact same fashion, tapering the length of both the under, middle, and overwing.


Colour strength!
I like to use materials that increase the colour strength of both the body and wing of the tube fly. For the body I only use synthetic materials, there is a lot to choose from in this area but I recommend using materials that are most similar to the main colours in the pattern you are tying. I have found a range of materials that help me achieve this. For example, for the tail I use Fluoro Fibre. For the body I use flatbraid, and for a few patterns I cover the flatbraid with Mirage tinsel to increase the colour strength. For the front body I use Angel Hair or Salmo Supreme dubbing, for the patterns with body hackle I also use Angel Hair for this. As flash in the wing I use Crinkle Mirror flash, this is a fantastic material available in a great range of colours and is only made up of clean colours.

Look at the strength of the colour.

 

Which tubing?
You can use the kind of tubes you like the best, the reason as to why I use plastic tubes for these flies is because I want the option to increase the colour strength of the fly by having a longer body on which to tie, and the opportunities this creates for tying in synthetic materials. Look at these pictures for how to “flash up” short tube bodies in a simple way.

A tip!
If you do not like to tie flies with cone heads, you can still in a simple manner take advantage of the balance and weight effects given by a cone head with regards to the swimming action of the fly. I balance most of my tube flies using lead wire; I feel this is the easiest and best option. What you can do is: I usually carry a couple of small bags of cone heads in the largest size. If I am fishing a beat with strong currents and I feel that the fly is not getting down into the “zone” quickly enough, I just put a cone head on the leader before attaching the fly. This ensures that the fly will dive quicker through the surface current, and thus it will be fishing in the right position more quickly for each cast and will increase the meeting time between salmon and fly.

Fly tying tip!!
You can use the solution in terms of cone heads that you are most comfortable with for my patterns, none of these fly patterns are originally tied using cone heads. The cone heads primarily offer an additional function in terms of balance and weight, which is very important in many situations.

See the article “Short tube bodies”. Here you can see how I construct my flies using lead wire.

 

The wing and the "bunch".
When tying tube flies with very long wings it is useful to tie in the wings the opposite way. This means that you tie in the wings the opposite way, and then fold them back over in the right direction, what happens then is that you will have a bunch of hair remaining under the wing, helping the wing to stay higher so that it will not tangle as easily with the hook when casting. It is important to adjust the length of this ”bunch”, it should be longer for long wings as this means it will support the wing better! See the article "Long wings” for the fly tying technique of folding the wings, and mixing in flash materials.

Long bunch for long wings.

All these tube flies have been tied using a Large tube as the outer tube, and a Small tube as the inner tube. The outer tube is 3 cm long. The inner tube is pushed into the outer tube, cut off and burned (with a lighter or similar) to improve durability of the fly.

The flies in these pictures are all between 14-18 centimetres in length.

 

Yellow White Wing.

Tag: Black Wing`n Flash, tied in ”chunky” fashion as support for the long tail.
Tail: Yellow Fluoro fibre.
Body: First a layer of Mirage tinsel, which will increase the gold hue of the flatbraid, then a layer of Gold flatbraid.
Front body: Hot Yellow, salmo supreme dubbing.
Underwing: Yellow Flashn Slinky.
Front Hackle no 1: Yellow Streamer Rooster Saddle.
Middle wing: Yellow Flashn Slinky, with some yellow and pearl Crinkle mirror flash, tied in before the wing is folded back over.
Overwing: White Flashn Slinky, with some yellow and pearl Crinkle mirror flash, tied in before the wing is folded back over.
Front Hackle no 2: White Streamer Rooster Saddle.

 

Blålystuba.

Tag: Black Wing`n Flash, tied in ”chunky” fashion as support for the long tail
Tail: Blue Fluoro Fibre.
Body: Silver, Flatbraid, cover the Flatbraid with Mirage tinsel; you will get a fantastic colouring of the silver body.
Body hackle: Tied in with Damsel Blue Angel Hair using a dubbing loop and a twister.
Front body: Damsel Blue, Angel Hair dubbing.
Underwing: Sea Blue Flashn Slinky.
Front Hackle no 1: Silver Doctor (blue) Streamer Rooster Saddle.
Middle wing: Sea Blue Flashn Slinky and a mix of blue and pearl Crinkle mirror flash, tied in before the wing is folded back over.
Overwing: Sea Blue Flashn Slinky and a mix of blue and pearl Crinkle mirror flash.
Front Hackle no 2: Silver Doctor (blue) Streamer Rooster Saddle, somewhat longet than the first one.

 

Green Highlander.

Tag: Black Wing`n Flash, tied in ”chunky” fashion as support for the long tail.
Tail: Yellow Fluoro Fibre.
Body: Yellow Flatbraid.
Front body: Green Angel Hair, applied in two layers, the inner layer is tied in tighth, whereas the second layer is tied in loosely, brush the hairs to get a body with volume.
Underwing: Yellow Flashn Slinky.
Front Hackle no 1: Yellow Streamer Rooster Saddle.
Middle wing: Yellow Flashn Slinky, mix in some yellow and pearl Crinkle mirror flash, tied in before the wing is folded back over.
Overwing: Green Flashn Slinky, mix in some green and pearl Crinkle mirror flash.
Front Hackle no 2: Green Streamer Rooster Saddle.

 

The Fire.

Tag: Black Wing`n Flash, tied in ”chunky” fashion as support for the long tail, so the tail will not tangle in the hook.
Tail: Red Fluoro Fibre.
Body: Gold Flatbraid.
Body hackle: Tied in with PMD Angel Hair using a dubbing loop and a twister.
Front body: PMD Angel Hair.
Underwing: Red Flashn Slinky.
Front hackle no 1: Red Streamer Rooster Saddle.
Overwing: Red Flashn Slinky, mix in some red and pearl Crinkle mirror flash, tied in before the wing is folded back over.
Front hackle no 2: Red Streamer Rooster Saddle, somewhat longer than hackle no 1.




jørem vald namsen

Up
E-mail j-granbo@hotmail.com - Copyright © 2018
Up